Travel in Wester Ross

Public Transport in Wester Ross

As a very rural area, Wester Ross does not have the range of public transport that you might expect in a city, but it is still possible to get around on public transport.

  • Fly to Inverness, Glasgow or Edinburgh and hire a car.
  • From the main train station at Inverness you can take a train bound for Kyle of Lochalsh, which stops at various stations in Wester Ross (timetables).
  • There are buses to Ullapool, Gairloch and Lochcarron (timetables).
Wester Ross
Wester Ross
Driving in Wester Ross

One of the features of this remote and rural place is that there are many single-track roads.

The following is the advice from Road Safety Scotland for travelling safely on single-track roads:

  • Single track roads are only wide enough for one vehicle. Stop in a passing place on your left to allow approaching traffic to pass. If the passing place is on your right, wait opposite to allow traffic to pass. You must stay on the left and not cross to a passing place on your right. It is the usual etiquette to give way to a vehicle coming uphill towards you.
  • Do not park in passing places, even just for a few minutes.
  • Do not hold up following traffic. If there is a vehicle behind you, stop in a passing pace on your left to allow them to overtake. Please spare a thought
    for those who live and work here and need to get to places while you are enjoying your holiday at a leisurely pace! Be aware of traffic behind you and
    pull in to let them pass.
The 'Right to Roam'

Scotland has some of the world’s best access rights with its ‘right to roam’ legislation, but please be aware that it does not mean that you have the right to go wherever you want. While the ‘right to roam’ allows you to walk or cycle in many places, you still do not have the right of access on some land (for example, private gardens or the land near to a private house whether or not it is fenced). And the ‘right to roam’ is for walking and cycling and does not extend to vehicles.

When it comes to driving, some roads are private roads and there is no right to drive on them. There will usually be signs saying ‘private road’ or ‘end of public road’, to make it clear where you can drive.

As for camping, if you are walking into the hills with a backpack you are allowed to wild camp on private land, as long as you cause no damage. However camping in a layby or on private land in a caravan or motorhome is not covered by the ‘right to roam’ and is strongly discouraged. If you have a motorhome or caravan please camp in a recognised campsite.

The right to roam comes with responsibilities. For full details please visit www.outdooraccess-scotland.com

Wester Ross